You are here

Cardioid Attractor Fundamental to Sustainability

Transactional games forming the heart of sustainable relationship (Part #1)


Introduction
Interrelating positive-negative hybrids
Ordering classes of interpersonal relationship
Corresponding Taoist perspective: Ba Gua diagram
Transcending dualism
Dynamics of a sustainable cycle
Psycho-social heat cycles
Disrupting the cycle
Coaction cardioid: interrelating the "games"
Mathematical functions of the cardioid
Sustainability: interrelating the Carnot cycle with the Cardioid "cycle"
Correspondence with inner and spiritual cycles
Understanding a cardioid pattern of transactional relationships
"Disorders of the heart"
Dangerous consequences of ignoring the cycle
Symbolic possibilities
References

[Parts: Next | Last | All ] [Links: To-K | From-K | From-Kx | Refs ]


Introduction

As explored in an associated paper (Being Positive Avoiding Negativity: Management challenge -- positive vs negative, 2004), exhortations and injunctions to "be positive" are a common feature of some religious groups, in the development of selling techniques, in self-help therapies, in work group development, and in living with potentially fatal illnesses. These are seen as a means of avoiding or defeating negativity in those different contexts [more]. Here the focus is on highlighting the existence of a set of games, rather than a single game, that potentially are all aspects of a sustainable cyclic system that merits further attention.

The paper explores, in the light of a general systems perspective, the possibility that this sustaining cycle can be understood in terms of the Carnot heat engine cycle and the Coaction Cardioid cycle of Edward Haskell (1972), further developed by Timothy Wilken (2002). It also explores whether any such generic cycle, relating "positive" and "negative" conditions, can also be related to the conditions identified by the Taoist Ba Gua mirror, and notably as a reflection of the cycle of processes described in Taoist spiritual disciplines.

d notably as a reflection of the cycle of processes described in Taoist spiritual disciplines.


[Parts: Next | Last | All ] [Links: To-K | From-K | From-Kx | Refs ]