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Reframing the EU Reform Process -- through Song

Responding to the Irish challenge to the Lisbon Treaty (Part #1)


Introduction
Incomprehensibility of the Lisbon Treaty
Role of song
Proposal: an Irish challenge to articulate the Lisbon Reform issues in song
Detailed arguments and research in support of this proposal
Precedent: Lisbon Treaty Song and Irish competitive singing
Opportunity for a "Eurosong Vision Contest"?
Catalyst: instigating a EU Cultural Ambassador Programme?
Responding to the challenge of cross-cultural encounters

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Introduction

Much has been said about the Irish "no" vote and the constitutional challenge for Europe. New thinking would seem to be scarce or, worse still, of a problematic nature. This tends to confirm impressions which resulted in the "no" vote.

It is most unfortunate that the main formal response of Europe has been the request to the Irish to "vote again" -- totally disrespectful of democratic process. This sets a curious precedent in that it occurred within the same time period as the call for a second vote by Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe. Is the future of democracy to be defined in terms of a "Mugabe-model"? When will it then be inappropriate to call for a "second vote" -- if many disapprove of the results of the first?

Why should the Irish -- as bearers of a democratic message -- be required to solve a problem that European officialdom repeatedly refuses to acknowledge? Where are the other options articulated by Europe, as argued by Timothy Garton Ash (Instead of bullying the Irish, Europe should be working on plan D - and E, The Guardian, 19 June 2008).

The following offers a pointer to a way of reframing the challenge completely -- through song.

e following offers a pointer to a way of reframing the challenge completely -- through song.